Companion Planting Cheat Sheet

Follow this cheat sheet to help your plants thrive with their right companions in your garden bed!

ASPARAGUS

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Companions:

BASIL

PARSLEY

TOMATOES

BEETS

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Companions:                                       Enemies:

BUSH BEANS      LETTUCE               POLE BEANS

ONIONS               CABBAGE

GARLIC

CABBAGE FAMILY

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Companions:                                       Enemies:

SAGE                BEETS                           TOMATOES

ROSEMARY     CELERY                          PEPPERS

POTATOES       GARLIC

ONIONS           SPINACH

CHARD            GERANIUM

LETTUCE

looseleaflettucevarietiesCompanions:                                                 Enemies:

CARROTS                CUCUMBER                     CELERY

RADISHES               BEANS                              PARSLEY

STRAWBERRIES     ONIONS

BEETS                      CABBAGE FAMILY

ONION & GARLIC

Onion-and-garlic-varietiesCompanions:                                                     Enemies:

CARROTS                   TOMATOES                      LEEKS      PEAS

RADISHES                   LETTUCE                         BEANS

STRAWBERRIES        CABBAGE                        PARSLEY 

PEAS

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Companions:                                     Enemies:

LAVENDER         BEANS                    ONIONS

CARROTS          CORN                       GARLIC

TURNIPS            RADISHES

CUCUMBER

*Grows well with most veggies & herbs.

PEPPERS

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Companions:                                            Enemies:

TOMATOES          CARROTS                     BEANS

GERANIUM          ONIONS                         KALE

BASIL                   EGGPLANTS                 CABBAGE FAMILY

POTATOES

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Companions:                                                   Enemies:

BEANS                         EGGPLANTS               PUMPKINS       MELONS

CABBAGE FAMILY      PEAS                           CUCUMBERS    TOMATOES

CORN                                                                SQUASH  

SPINACH

images Companions:                                     

STRAWBERRIES                             

PEAS

CABBAGE FAMILY

Tomatoes

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Companions:                                            Enemies:

BASIL                 CARROTS                        POTATOES

OREGANO         CELERY                           FENNEL

PARSLEY           GERANIUM                      KOHLRABI

CHIVES              ASPARAGUS                   CABBAGE FAMILY

ONIONS            PEPPERS

CUCUMBERS

THYME

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Companions:

CABBAGE

ROSEMARY

imagesCompanions:

CARROTS

CABBAGE

SAGE

BEANS

No Gardening Space? No Problem!

Many of us aren’t fortunate enough to have spacious yards to enables us to plant various fruits and veggies.  With limited gardening space, it requires us to be more picky & selective on what to plant each season. Especially when we have high hopes of having a bountiful harvest from what we’ve planted.

Luckily, there are plenty of SPACE SAVING options available. Using one of these methods can also help you achieve that end result that every gardener desires… A SUCCESSFUL HARVEST WITH ENDLESS AMOUNTS OF VEGGIES & FRUITS!

During this time of year, it’s the right time to plant your SEED POTATOES & ONIONS SETS OR TRANSPLANTS. Click below to figure out which SPACE SAVING method will fit best with your ‘small’ situation.

You Can Grow POTATOES…

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In a Wooden Box                                   In a Garbage Can 

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        In a Sack                                              In a Tower

You Can Grow ONIONS…

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Vertically on a Windowsill               In a Burlap Sack

container Onions                   growingleek-211x300

      In a Container                              In a Mason Jar

Master Gardeners TIP: Onions are cool weather veggies that can be easily grown indoors year-round!  

Growing Dahlias

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Dahlias are perennial flowers that come in various shapes, sizes and colors. These flowers thrive in cool and moist climates which make them perfect for us Pacific Northwesters to grow! However, many struggle with growing these plants into blooming beds of rich color and then turn away from trying to grow them ever again.

Here are TIPS that’ll make you rethink twice about how difficult it is to grow dahlias.

 Preparation for  Planting

  • Soil temperature should be at 60 degrees.
  • Location of planting should receive full sun ( 6 to 8 hours of sunlight)
  • PH level of your soil should be 6.5- 7.0 and slightly acidic. Dahlias grow better in rich, well- drained soil.

 Planting

  • When planting the dahlia tubes, make sure the hole in the soil is slightly larger than the root ball of the tube with some compost or peat moss into the soil.
  • Plant the tubes 9 to 12 inches apart. For small flowering types, space two feet apart and for tall, large flowering types, space three feet apart when planting.
  • Plant tubes that have a little bit of green growth instead of ones that appear to be wrinkled or rotten.
  • Do NOT cut or break individual tubes as you would with potatoes and plant them WHOLE.
  • Plant them with the growing points, or ‘eyes’ pointing up and about 6 to 8 inches deep.
  • Do NOT water right after planting since this encourages rot to happen. Instead, water when you notice sprouts have appeared above the soil.
  • Do NOT cover with mulch or bark which can challenge sprouting to happen.
  • Blooming will start to occur about eight weeks after planting.

 Fertilizing 

  • Do NOT fertilize at planting.
  • Use a fertilizer that is low in nitrogen (5-10-10 or 10-20-20 are recommended).
  • Apply fertilizer when plants begin sprouting and then every three to four week from mid- summer to early Autumn.

Watering

  • Do NOT water the soil until the Dahlia plants appear.
  • Do NOT over water which can cause the tubes to rot.
  • Once plants are established, do a deep watering two to three times a week for at least 30 minutes ( a little longer during warmer climates).

 Pruning

  • To achieve nice stems for cutting: compact plants, pinch out the center shoot above the third set of leaves.
  • To get the most out of your cut flowers, place them in very hot water (160 degrees F) and leave it in there until it cools down.

After Season Care

  • Foliage blackens when the first frost happens.
  • In zone 8, dahlias can be cut back and left in the ground during winter but cover with a deep, dry mulch.
  • In other areas, the tubes should be taken out of the ground. Wait a few days after the foliage blackens to remove from the soil.

 

Still think Dahlia’s are difficult to grow? 

Come to our DAHLIAS SEMINAR on JUNE 7 at 11 A.M. to learn from a MASTER GARDNER on how to be successful with this flower!

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6 Reasons Why You Should Start Gardening NOW

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Gardening is…

  • Good exercise

Gardening for 45 minutes can burn as many calories when you do 30 minutes of aerobics.  Pulling weeds and digging holes puts your lower and upper body muscles to work while also toning them.

  • A stress reliever

Horticulture therapy has reign popularity recently after people have discovered the benefits from gardening. Horticulture therapist prescribes people to garden to help them sleep better, boost mood levels and reduce anxiety

  • A money saver

Buying organic produce can be a hefty cost and the price for it isn’t decreasing anytime soon. Growing your own vegetable garden can help you cut the cost of your grocery bill.

  • Helping our planet stay green

Prevents soil erosion, protects water quality, saves energy and beautifies your community are a few positives that gardening provides for our planet.

  • Provides delicious and tastier food 

Homegrown produce is usually tastier than to store brought. Growing your own organic vegetables will be loaded with vitamins and nutrients than vegetables that are treated with synthetic pesticides.

  • Good for children 

There are many lessons being taught to while a child gardens. The child will learn about the importance of patience, eating healthy and the responsibility of taking care of another living thing.